East-Timor In February 20th, 1942, the Japanese Imperial Military invaded the East-Timor, the then colonization of Portugal which was taking a neutral position against Japan. Eventually, Japan repelled the Australian armies and occupied the entire of the East-Timor, but lost its mastery of sea and air by the U.N. force’s rally against it. More than 12,000 Japanese armies stationed in the East-Timor when they were cut off from the supplies and they seized around 400,000 aborigines in this “prison with no bars”. Aborigines were commanded to serve the Japanese military for foodsupply, labor, comfort women and courtesans of military-generals.
After the WWII, Indonesia had controlled the East-Timor by military force since 1975, so comfort women survivors were not given oppor tunities to sue their sufferings in the past and continuously, the Indonesian Military had raped and tortured women at the comfort stations for a long time. In 1999, when the UN provisionally administrated the East-Timor, an investigation for sexual-abuse survivors of the Japanese Imperial Military was launched, and the East-Timor decided to participate in the Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal on Japan’s Military Sexual Slavery. Two former comfort women came forward to speak at this court for the first time. After then, the government and NGOs from Japan collaborated to carry out public hearings and investigations for comfort women survivors, or exhibit sexual violence panels, while regularly visiting their homes, which has been continued until today.

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Ines de Jesus

When many Japanese soldiers showed up, so the village foreman sent me away. There were two houses there, and I was...

Fransisca Marcedu

I don’t know when it was, but Japanese soldiers came and asked my parents for me. I said that I didn’t want to go,...

Carminda Dou

With a crooked back and small appearance, the victim looked over 90 years old. Having Alzheimer’s for a long time,...

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